Oregon
Rule Rule 581-029-0001
School Safety and Prevention System


(1)

The following definitions apply to the School Safety and Prevention system established in ORS 339.341 (Statewide School Safety and Prevention System):

(a)

“Evidenced-based, Multitiered Practice” means a practice implemented by the school-wide system that:

(A)

Provides services across three tiers: universal, selected, and targeted supports;
(B)  Promotes the mental health and well-being of students and supports academic, behavioral and social-emotional success for students, within a multitiered framework with an emphasis on protected classes, historically, traditionally and currently underserved students and youth, by matching increasing levels of culturally and linguistically responsive support to empower students to meet their needs and goals;
(C)  Operates within a continuous improvement framework in which decisions are based on research, evidence, and data;

(D)

Counters racial and other types of profiling and discriminatory acts; and

(E)

Directly and intentionally addresses implicit and explicit bias.                                                   

(b)

 “Evidence-based” means an activity, strategy, or intervention that demonstrates:

(A)

A statistically significant effect on improving student outcomes or other relevant outcomes based on:

(i)

Strong evidence from at least one well-designed and well-implemented experimental study;

(ii)

Moderate evidence from at least one well-designed and well-implemented quasi-experimental study using a large or multi-site sample; or

(iii)

Promising evidence from at least one well-designed and well-implemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias; or

(B)

(i) A rationale based on high quality research findings or positive evaluation that such activity, strategy, or intervention adheres to antidiscrimination laws, and is likely to improve student outcomes or other relevant outcomes based on a well-specified logic model informed by research or an evaluation that suggests how the intervention will improve relevant outcomes; and

(ii)

Ongoing efforts to examine, evaluate and reflect upon the effectiveness of such activity, strategy, or intervention on the intended outcomes..
(C) Improving outcomes for historically, traditionally, and currently underserved and  marginalized students.

(c)

“Safety Assessment” means a psychosocial, behavioral assessment that is conducted by a multidisciplinary team to:

(A)

Assess and reduce the possibility of self-injury or injury to others;

(B)

Provide support and intervention services; and

(C)

Assess existing strengths, supports, needs and available resources.

(d)

“School Safety and Prevention Specialist” means the specialist as provided in ORS 339.341 (Statewide School Safety and Prevention System).

(e)

“System” means the Statewide School Safety and Prevention System as provided in ORS 339.341 (Statewide School Safety and Prevention System).

(2)

The System shall be supported by a School Safety and Prevention Specialist who:

(a)

Participates in ongoing information sharing and assistance to school districts and education service districts and may provide assistance to private alternative schools and nonprofits that support youth-centered activities for public school students;

(b)

Ensures supports within the school safety and prevention system are accessible to historically, traditionally and currently underserved and marginalized students and youth, using the Department’s equity lens as provided in 581-013-0010 (Equity Lens), including supports for the implementation of:

(A)

Safety assessments;

(B)

Suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention; and

(C)

Prevention of bullying, cyberbullying, sexual violence, harassment, or intimidation.

(c)

Develops and implements the System in a manner that is designed to result in fewer disproportionate and more equitable outcomes for historically, traditionally and currently underserved and marginalized students and youth.

(d)

Supports prevention, intervention and postvention programs that:

(A)

Are rooted in health education, social emotional learning, culturally and linguistically responsive and restorative practices, and trauma-informed principles and practices;

(B)

Meaningfully engage and include voices and choices of youth, including but not limited to: youth of color; youth identifying as LGBTQIA2S+; youth with disabilities; youth who are emergent bilinguals; youth bereaved by suicide; youth with mental illness or substance use disorders, youth navigating poverty, homelessness, and foster care;

(C)

Are informed by family and community-based dialogue and discussions; and

(D)

Align with or support:

(i)

Suicide prevention, intervention and postvention plans as provided in ORS 339.343 (Comprehensive district plans on student suicide prevention) (Adi’s Act);

(ii)

Safe Schools Act as provided in ORS 339.351 (Definitions for ORS 339.351 to 339.364) to 339.364 (Victim may seek redress under other laws); and

(iii)

Oregon Health Education Standards as provided in ORS 329.045 (Revision of Common Curriculum Goals, performance indicators, diploma requirements, Essential Learning Skills and academic content standards).

(e)

Completes equity training that is approved by the Department of Education;
(f)  Participates in regional, professional learning communities;
(g)  Participates in consultation with Tribal governments within the service area in the development and implementation of the School Safety and Prevention System;

(h)

Meaningfully engage the voice of disproportionately impacted youth in the development and implementation of the School Safety and Prevention System.

(i)

For the purpose of prevention, countering profiling, and enhancing the use of a racial equity lens and an equity lens, considers input from, shares information, and consults with the following:

(A)

Youth as provided in subsection (2)(d)(b);

(B)

Primary care organizations;

(C)

Families and other caregivers;

(D)

Community-based organizations;

(E)

School staff;

(F)

School-based health centers;

(G)

School-based mental health providers and behavioral specialists; 

(H)

Federally-recognized Tribal Governments in Oregon;

(I)

Youth Development Council;

(J)

Oregon Youth Authority;

(K)

Local district attorneys and public defenders;

(L)

Local law enforcement;

(M)

Local mental health providers;

(N)

State and county juvenile justice systems; and

(O)

Other relevant partners.
(j) Engage education stakeholders, community partners, and Tribal governments in the development and implementation of the School Safety and Prevention System.
Source
Last accessed
Jul. 9, 2020