Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Programs

Rule Rule 413-070-0000
Definitions


The following definitions apply to OAR chapter 413, division 70.
(1) “Adoption” means a legal or administrative process that establishes a permanent legal parent-child relationship between a child and an adult who is not already the child’s legal parent and terminates the legal parent-child relationship between the adopted child and any former parent.
(2) “Adoptive resource” means an individual or individuals selected by the Department, another public child welfare agency, or a licensed adoption agency as the adoptive family for a child where no administrative review was requested within the timeframe allowed for such a request, or if a review was requested, the selection has been sustained by that review and the review is complete.
(3) “Affected family members” means biological and legal parents, extended family members, and any person within the fifth degree of consanguinity to the child.
(4) “Age-appropriate or developmentally appropriate activities” means:
(a) Activities or items that are generally accepted as suitable for children or young adults of the same chronological age or level of maturity or that are determined to be developmentally appropriate for a child or young adult, based on the development of cognitive, emotional, physical, and behavioral capacities that are typical for an age or age group; and
(b) In the case of a specific child or young adult, activities or items that are suitable for the child or young adult based on the developmental stages attained by the child or young adult with respect to the cognitive, emotional, physical, and behavioral capacities of the child or young adult.
(5) “Antipsychotic medication” means a medication, specified in class 28:16:08 by the American Hospital Formulary Service, used to treat psychosis and other conditions.
(6) “APPLA” means Another Planned Permanent Living Arrangement, a permanency plan for a stable secure living arrangement for a child who has reached the age of 16 or young adult that includes building relationships with significant people in the child’s life that may continue after substitute care. APPLA is the least preferred permanency plan of the five permanency plans for a child or young adult and is appropriate only after the permanency plans of reunification, adoption, guardianship, and placement with a fit and willing relative have been determined not in the best interests of a child or young adult.
(a) “Planned” means the arrangement is intended, designed, and deliberate.
(b) “Permanent” means enduring and stable.
(7) “Assessment” means the determination of a child or young adult’s need for mental health services through interviewing the child or young adult and obtaining all pertinent medical and psychosocial history information from the individual, family, and collateral sources. The “assessment:”
(a) Addresses the current complaint or condition presented by the child or young adult;
(b) Determines a diagnosis; and
(c) Provides treatment direction and individualized services and supports.
(8) “Base rate payment” means a payment to the foster parent or relative caregiver for the costs of providing the child or young adult with the following:
(a) Food, including the special or unique nutritional needs of the child or young adult;
(b) Clothing, including purchase and replacement;
(c) Housing, including maintenance of household utilities, furnishings, and equipment;
(d) Daily supervision, including teaching and directing to ensure safety and well-being at a level appropriate for the age of the child or young adult;
(e) Personal incidentals, including personal care items, entertainment, reading materials, and miscellaneous items; and
(f) Transportation, including gas, oil, and vehicle maintenance and repair costs for local travel associated with providing the items listed above, and transportation to and from extracurricular, child care, recreational, and cultural activities.
(9) “CANS screening” means Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths screening, a process of gathering information on the needs and strengths of a child or young adult:
(a) To identify case planning, service planning, and supervision needs of the child or young adult in substitute care with a certified family;
(b) To determine the level of care payment while in substitute care with a certified family; and
(c) To determine if a child or young adult qualifies for a level of care payment for the purpose of negotiating or renegotiating an adoption assistance or guardianship assistance payment.
(10) “Caregiver relationship” means a relationship between a person and a child or young adult that meets all of the following requirements:
(a) The relationship has existed for the 12 months immediately preceding the initiation of a dependency proceeding, for at least six months during a dependency proceeding, or for half of the child’s life if the child is less than six months of age. A “caregiver relationship” does not include a relationship between a child or young adult and a person who is an unrelated foster parent of the child or young adult unless the relationship continued for a period of at least twelve consecutive months.
(b) The person had physical custody of the child or young adult or resided in the same household as the child or young adult and provided the child or young adult on a daily basis with the love, nurturing, and other necessities required to meet the psychological and physical needs of the child or young adult.
(c) The child or young adult depended on the relationship to meet the needs of the child or young adult.
(11) “CASA” means a court appointed special advocate: a volunteer who is appointed by the court, is a party to the juvenile proceeding, and advocates for the child pursuant to ORS 419B.112 (Court appointed special advocate).
(12) “Case plan” means a written goal-oriented, time-limited individualized plan for the child or young adult and the family of the child or young adult, developed by the Department and the parents or guardians, to achieve the safety, permanency, and well-being of the child or young adult.
(13) “Central Office Guardianship Committee” means a group of individuals convened by Department staff to make recommendations to the Child Welfare Program Manager or designee regarding a guardianship plan.
(14) “Certificate of Approval” means a document that the Department issues to approve the operation of a child-specific relative caregiver home, child-specific foster home, pre-adoptive home, or a regular foster home.
(15) “Child” means a person under 18 years of age.
(16) “Child-family contact” means communication between the child or young adult and family and includes, but is not limited to, visitation with the child or young adult, participation in the child or young adult’s activities, and appointments, phone calls, e-mail, and written correspondence.
(17) “Child’s home” means the home from which the child is removed under the provisions of ORS 419B.150 (When protective custody authorized).
(18) “Committee facilitator” means a Department staff member appointed as a member of the committee to facilitate a permanency or adoption committee meeting.
(19) “Concurrent permanent plan” means the alternate permanency plan whenever the child has been placed in substitute care when the goal of the permanency plan is to return the child to the parents. The “concurrent permanent plan” is developed simultaneously with the plan to return the child to the parents or legal guardians.
(20) “Conditions for return” means a written statement of the specific behaviors, conditions, or circumstances that must exist within a child’s home before a child can safely return and remain in the home with an in-home ongoing safety plan.
(21) “Congregate care residential setting” means any setting that cares for more than one child or young adult in the care or custody of the Department and is not one of the following settings:
(a) A foster home certified by the Department under OAR 413-200-0270 (Purpose) to 413-200-0298 (Confidentiality of Applicant or Certified Resource Family Information);
(b) A foster home certified by the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services under OAR 411-346-0100 (Statement of Purpose) to 411-346-0240 (Standards for Entry, Transfer, Exit, and Closure);
(c) A residential facility licensed by the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services under OAR 411-325-0100 to 411-325-0490 (Provider Eligibility for Medicaid Service Payment);
(d) A proctor foster home certified by a foster care agency under OAR 413-215-0301 (Foster Care Agencies, What Law Applies) to 413-215-0396 (Foster Care Agencies: Information About Children in Care Placed in Physical Custody of the Foster Care Agency); or
(e) A foster home certified and licensed by a participating tribe.
(22) “Cultural heritage” means the language, customary beliefs, social norms, and material traits including, but not limited to, the dress, food, music, and dance of a racial, religious, or social group that are transmitted from one generation to another.
(23) “Current caretaker” means a foster parent who:
(a) Is currently caring for a child in the care and custody of the Department and has a permanency plan or concurrent permanent plan of adoption; and
(b) Has cared for the child or at least one sibling of the child for at least 12 months or for one-half of the child’s or sibling’s life if the child or sibling is younger than two years of age. Time spent caring for the child or sibling under this definition is calculated cumulatively.
(24) “Department” means the Department of Human Services, Child Welfare.
(25) “Designee” means a person who the designator directly and immediately supervises or a person with equal or greater management responsibility than the designator.
(26) “Enhanced supervision” means the additional support, direction, observation, and guidance necessary to promote and ensure the safety and well-being of the child or young adult when the child or young adult qualifies for a level of care payment.
(27) “Entity” means any organization or agency including, but not limited to a private child placing agency, that is separate and independent of the Department, performs functions pursuant to a contract or subcontract with the Department, and receives federal funds.
(28) “Extended family member” means a person ordinarily recognized as the refugee child’s parent by the custom of the child’s culture, or a person 18 years of age or older who is the child’s grandparent, aunt or uncle, brother or sister, brother-in-law or sister-in-law, niece or nephew, first or second cousin, or stepparent.
(29) “Face-to-face” means an in-person interaction between individuals.
(30) “Family member” means any person related to the child or young adult by blood, marriage, or adoption, including, but not limited to the parents, grandparents, stepparents, aunts, uncles, sisters, brothers, cousins, and great-grandparents. “Family member” also includes the registered domestic partner of a person related to the child, a child 12 years of age or older, and when appropriate, a child younger than 12 years of age. Under the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), “family member” has the meaning given by the law or custom of the child’s tribe.
(31) “Fictive kin” has the same meaning as kith and means an individual who is not related to the child or young adult by blood, adoption or marriage but has an emotionally significant relationship with the child or young adult that has the characteristics of a family relationship.
(32) “Fit and willing relative” means an individual who meets the eligibility criteria in OAR 413-070-1010 (Eligibility Requirements for a Fit and Willing Relative).
(33) “Foster care agency” means a private child-caring agency that offers to place children by taking physical custody of and then placing the children in a home certified by the agency.
(34) “Foster care placement” means any action removing, or which could result in the removal of, a child from his or her parent or Indian custodian, such as court-ordered supervision in the home, for placement in foster care, with a guardian, or in an institution where the parent or Indian custodian cannot have the child returned upon demand, but where parental rights have not been terminated.
(35) “Foster parent” means an individual who operates a home that has been approved by the Department to provide care for an unrelated child or young adult placed in the home by the Department.
(36) “General applicant” means an individual who:
(a) Is neither a relative or current caretaker; and
(b) Has submitted a completed application to adopt a child.
(37) “Grandparent” for purposes of notification, visitation, contact, or communication ordered by the court under ORS 419B.876 (Visitation or other contact between grandparent and ward) means the legal parent of the child or young adult’s legal parent, regardless of whether the parental rights of the child’s or young adult’s legal parent have been terminated under ORS 419B.500 (Termination of parental rights generally) to 419B.524 (Effect of termination order).
(38) “Guardian” means an individual who has been granted guardianship of a child through a judgment of the court.
(39) “Guardianship assistance” means assistance provided by the Department to the guardian on behalf of an eligible child or young adult to offset costs associated with meeting the ongoing needs of the child or young adult. “Guardianship assistance” may be in the form of a payment, medical coverage, or reimbursement of guardianship expenses.
(40) “Guardianship assistance agreement” means a written agreement, binding on the parties to the agreement, between the Department and the potential guardian or guardian setting forth the assistance the Department is to provide on behalf of the child or young adult, the responsibilities of the guardian and the Department, and the manner in which the agreement and amount of assistance may be modified or terminated.
(41) “Guardianship assistance agreement only” means a written agreement, binding on the parties to the agreement, between the Department and the potential guardian or guardian of an eligible child or young adult, when the potential guardian or guardian is not receiving a guardianship assistance payment or medical coverage at the time of the agreement but may request it at a later date.
(42) “Guardianship assistance payment” means a monthly payment made by the Department to the guardian on behalf of the eligible child or young adult.
(43) “Guardianship Assistance Review Committee” means a committee composed of local and central office Department staff with expertise in the area of guardianship.
(44) “Homeless, runaway, and transitional living shelter” means a child-caring agency that provides residential services or operates a shelter, mass shelter, or transitional living program for a homeless or runaway child or young adult, a pregnant or parenting child or young adult, or other children and young adults in care working toward independent living.
(45) “Home visit” means a face-to-face contact at an individual’s residence.
(46) “ICWA” means the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, 25 U.S.C. §§ 1901-63.
(47) “Impending danger safety threat” means a family behavior, condition, or circumstance that meets all five safety threshold criteria. When it is occurring, this type of threat to a child is not immediate, obvious, or occurring at the onset of the CPS intervention. This threat is identified and understood more fully by evaluating and understanding individual and family functioning.
(48) “Incapacity” means a physical or mental illness, or impairment that reduces substantially or eliminates the individual’s ability to support, care for, or meet the needs of the child and is expected to be permanent.
(49) “Independent living housing subsidy” means a payment to assist in covering the cost of room, board, or other monthly expenses made to an eligible individual who is at least 16 years of age and is in the care and custody of the Department and living independently.
(50) “Indian” means any person who is a member of or eligible for membership in an Indian tribe or who is an Alaskan native and a member of a Regional Corporation as defined in 43 USC section 1606.
(51) “Indian child” means any unmarried person who is under age 18 and either:
(a) Is a member or citizen of an Indian tribe; or
(b) Is eligible for membership or citizenship in an Indian tribe and is the biological child of a member or citizen of an Indian tribe.
(52) “Indian child’s tribe” means the Indian tribe in which an Indian child is a member or eligible for membership. In the case of an Indian child who is a member or eligible for membership in more than one Indian tribe, it is the Indian tribe with which the Indian child has the most significant contacts.
(53) “Interethnic Adoption Provisions of the Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996” (“IEPA”) means section 1808 of the act which is entitled “Removal of Barriers to Interethnic Adoption”, and affirms and strengthens the prohibition against discrimination in adoption or foster care placements, and is codified in 42 USC section 671(a)18.
(54) “Legal assistance specialist” means an Adoption Program staff member who provides consultation on the technical and legal processes to achieve a permanency plan for a child in the legal custody of the Department.
(55) “Level of care payment” means the payment provided to an approved or certified family based on the need for enhanced supervision of a child or young adult determined by applying the CANS algorithm to the results of the CANS screening.
(56) “Licensed medical professional” means an individual who meets the criteria of both of the following subsections:
(a) The individual holds at least one of the following valid licensures or certifications:
(A) Physician licensed to practice in the State of Oregon;
(B) Nurse practitioner certified by the Oregon State Board of Nursing under ORS 678.375 (Nurse practitioners); or
(C) Physician assistant licensed to practice in the State of Oregon.
(b) The individual’s training, experience, and competence demonstrate expertise in children’s mental health, the ability to conduct a mental health assessment, and the ability to provide psychotropic medication management for children and young adults.
(57) “Medically accepted indication,” defined in ORS 418.517 (Procedures for use of psychotropic medications for children in foster care), means any use for a covered outpatient drug that is approved under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, or recommended by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, or the use of which is supported by one or more citations included or approved for inclusion in any of the following compendia:
(a) American Hospital Formulary Services drug information;
(b) United States Pharmacopoeia drug information or any successor publication;
(c) The DRUGDEX Information System; or
(d) Peer-reviewed medical literature.
(58) “Multiethnic Placement Act of 1994” means federal statutes which prohibit discrimination based on race, color, or national origin as considerations in adoption and foster placements.
(59) “Nonrecurring guardianship assistance agreement” means a written agreement, binding on the parties to the agreement, between the Department and the potential guardian of an eligible child for a one-time payment to reimburse the guardian for the reasonable and necessary expenses incurred in legally finalizing the guardianship.
(60) “Nonrecurring guardianship expenses” means a one-time payment of up to $2,000 per child that the Department will make to a guardian to assist with the reasonable and necessary expenses associated with obtaining legal guardianship of an eligible child.
(61) “Office of Developmental Disabilities Services” means the Department of Human Services, Office of Developmental Disabilities Services.
(62) “Parent” means the biological or adoptive mother or the legal father of the child. A legal father is a man who has adopted the child or whose paternity has been established or declared under ORS 109.070 (Presumption of parentage), ORS 416.400 to 416.610 (Action against recipient who fails to provide notice of claim), or by a juvenile court. In cases involving an Indian child under the ICWA, parent means any biological parent of an Indian child, or any Indian who has lawfully adopted an Indian child, including adoptions under tribal law or custom. It does not include an unwed biological father where paternity has not been acknowledged or established. “Parent” also includes a putative father who has demonstrated a direct and significant commitment to the child by assuming or attempting to assume responsibilities normally associated with parenthood, unless a court finds that the putative father is not the legal father.
(63) “Participating tribe” means a federally-recognized Indian tribe in Oregon with a Title IV-E agreement with the Department.
(64) “Permanency committee” means a group of individuals who are responsible for making a recommendation regarding a permanency plan or a potential permanency resource when the child or young adult likely is not returning to his or her parent.
(65) “Permanency plan” means a written course of action for achieving safe and lasting family resources for the child or young adult. Although the plan may change as more information becomes available, the goal is to develop safe and permanent family resources with the parents, relatives, or other people who will assume responsibility for the child or young adult during the remaining years of dependency and be accessible and supportive to the child or young adult in adulthood.
(66) “Permanent foster care” means the out of home placement of a child or young adult in which there is a long-term foster care agreement between each substitute caregiver and the Department approved by the juvenile court under which the substitute caregiver commits to raise a child in substitute care until the age of majority and be accessible to and supportive of the child into adulthood, until the court determines that APPLA - “permanent foster care” is no longer the appropriate permanency plan for the child or young adult.
(67) “Potential guardian” means an individual who is being considered by the Department or participating tribe to be the legal guardian of the child.
(68) “Provider” means an individual approved by a licensed private child-caring agency to provide care for a child or young adult, or an employee of a licensed private child-caring agency approved to provide care for a child or young adult.
(69) “Psychotropic medication,” defined in ORS 418.517 (Procedures for use of psychotropic medications for children in foster care), means medication, the prescribed intent of which is to affect or alter thought processes, mood, or behavior, including, but not limited to antipsychotic, antidepressant, and anxiolytic medication and behavior medications. The classification of a medication depends upon its stated, intended effect when prescribed because it may have many different effects.
(70) “Qualified individual” means an individual who is:
(a) A trained professional or licensed clinician;
(b) Not an employee of the Department or of the Oregon Health Authority;
(c) Not connected to, or affiliated with, any placement setting in which a child or young adult is placed by the Department.
(71) “Qualified mental health professional” means an individual who meets the requirements of both of the following subsections:
(a) Holds at least one of the following educational degrees:
(A) Graduate degree in psychology;
(B) Bachelor’s degree in nursing and is licensed by the state of Oregon;
(C) Graduate degree in social work;
(D) Graduate degree in a behavioral science field;
(E) Graduate degree in recreational, art, or music therapy; or
(F) Bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy and is licensed by the State of Oregon.
(b) Whose education and experience demonstrates the competencies to:
(A) Identify precipitating events;
(B) Gather histories of mental and physical disabilities, alcohol and drug use, past mental health services, and criminal justice contacts;
(C) Assess family, social, and work relationships;
(D) Conduct a mental status examination;
(E) Document a multiaxial DSM diagnosis;
(F) Develop and supervise a treatment plan;
(G) Conduct a mental health assessment; and
(H) Provide individual, family, or group therapy within the scope of his or her practice.
(72) “Qualified residential treatment program (QRTP)” means a program that:
(a) Provides residential care and treatment to a child or young adult who, based on a QRTP assessment, requires specialized, evidence-based supports and services related to the effects of trauma or mental, emotional or behavioral health needs.
(b) Uses a trauma-informed treatment model that is designed to address the needs, including clinical needs as appropriate, of the child or young adult.
(c) Ensures that the staff at the facility includes licensed or registered nurses licensed under ORS chapter 678 and other licensed clinical staff who:
(A) Provide care within their licensed scope of practice;
(B) Are on site according to the treatment model identified in OAR 410-170-0030 (BRS Contractor and BRS Provider Requirements) (2); and
(C) Are available 24 hours per day and seven days per week.
(d) Facilitates the involvement of the family of the child or young adult, as defined in ORS 418.575 (Definitions for ORS 418.575 to 418.598), in the treatment program of the child or young adult, to the extent appropriate, and in accordance with the best interests of the child or young adult.
(e) Facilitates outreach to the family of the child or young adult, as defined in ORS 418.575 (Definitions for ORS 418.575 to 418.598), documents how outreach is made and maintains contact information for any known biological relatives or fictive kin, as defined by the Department.
(f) Documents how the program integrates family into the treatment process of the child or young adult, including after discharge, and how sibling connections are maintained.
(g) Provides discharge planning and family-based after-care support for at least six months following the discharge from the program.
(h) Is accredited as outlined in OAR 413-095-0000 (Definitions) (2).
(73) “QRTP assessment” means an assessment of the strengths and needs of a child or young adult by a qualified individual using the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths tool in combination with a review of clinical documentation to determine the most effective and appropriate level of care for the child or young adult.
(74) “Race” means American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, White.
(75) “RCWAC” means the Refugee Child Welfare Advisory Committee.
(76) “Reasonable and prudent parent standard” means the standard, characterized by careful and sensible parental decisions that maintain the health, safety, and best interests of a child or young adult while encouraging the emotional and developmental growth of the child or young adult, that a substitute care provider shall use when determining whether to allow a child or young adult in substitute care to participate in extracurricular, enrichment, cultural, and social activities.
(77) “Refugee child” has the meaning given the term in ORS 418.925 (“Refugee child” defined).
(78) “Registered domestic partner” means an individual joined in a domestic partnership that is registered by a county clerk in accordance with ORS 106.300 (Short title) to 106.340 (Certain privileges, immunities, rights, benefits and responsibilities granted or imposed).
(79) “Relative” means any of the following:
(a) An individual with one of the following relationships to the child or young adult through the parent of the child or young adult unless the relationship has been dissolved by adoption of the child, young adult, or parent:
(A) Any blood relative of preceding generations denoted by the prefixes of grand, great, or great-great.
(B) Any half-blood relative of preceding generations denoted by the prefixes of grand, great, or great-great. Individuals with one common biological parent are half-blood relatives.
(C) An aunt, uncle, nephew, niece, first cousin, and first cousin once removed.
(D) A spouse of anyone listed in paragraphs (A) to (C) of this subsection, even if a petition for annulment, dissolution, or separation has been filed or the marriage is terminated by divorce or death. To be considered a “relative” under this paragraph, the child or young adult must have had a relationship with the spouse prior to the most recent episode of Department custody.
(b) An individual with one of the following relationships to the child or young adult:
(A) A sibling, also to include an individual with a sibling relationship to the child or young adult through a putative father.
(B) An individual defined as a relative by the law or custom of the tribe of the child or young adult if the child or young adult is an Indian child under the Indian Child Welfare Act or in the legal custody of a tribe.
(C) An individual defined as a relative of a refugee child or young adult under OAR 413-070-0300 (Purpose) to 413-070-0380 (Refugee Child Welfare Advisory Committee).
(D) A stepparent or former stepparent if the child or young adult had a relationship with the former stepparent prior to the most recent episode of Department custody; a stepbrother; or a stepsister.
(E) A registered domestic partner of the parent of the child or young adult or a former registered domestic partner of the parent of the child or young adult if the child or young adult had a relationship with the former domestic partner prior to the most recent episode of Department custody.
(F) The adoptive parent or an individual who has been designated as the adoptive resource of a sibling of the child or young adult.
(G) An unrelated legal or biological father or mother of a half-sibling of the child or young adult when the half-sibling of the child or young adult is living with the unrelated legal or biological father or mother.
(c) An individual identified by the child or young adult or the family of the child or young adult, or an individual who self-identifies, as being related to the child or young adult through the parent of the child or young adult by blood, adoption, or marriage to a degree other than an individual specified as a “relative” in paragraphs (A) to (C) of subsection (a) of this section unless the relationship has been dissolved by adoption of the child, young adult, or parent.
(d) An individual meeting the requirements of at least one of the following:
(A) An individual not related to the child, young adult, or parent by blood, adoption, or marriage:
(i) Who is identified as a member of the family by the child or young adult or by the family of the child or young adult; and
(ii) Who had an emotionally significant relationship with the child or young adult or the family of the child or young adult prior to the most recent episode of Department custody.
(B) An individual who has a blood relationship to the child or young adult as described in paragraphs (A) to (C) of subsection (a) of this section through the birth parent of the child or young adult, but the prior legal relationship has been dissolved by adoption of the child, young adult, or birth parent, and who is identified as a member of the family by the child or young adult or who self-identifies as a member of the family.
(e) For eligibility for the guardianship assistance program:
(A) A stepparent is considered a parent and is not a “relative” for the purpose of eligibility for guardianship assistance unless a petition for annulment, dissolution, or separation has been filed, or the marriage to the adoptive or biological parent of the child has been terminated by divorce or death.
(B) A foster parent may only be considered a “relative” for the purpose of eligibility for guardianship assistance when:
(i) There is a compelling reason why adoption is not an achievable permanency plan;
(ii) The foster parent is currently caring for a child, in the care or custody of the Department or a participating tribe, who has a permanency plan or concurrent permanent plan of guardianship;
(iii) The foster parent has cared for the child for at least 12 of the past 24 months; and
(iv) The Department or tribe has approved the foster parent for consideration as a guardian.
(80) “Relative caregiver” means an individual who operates a home that has been approved by the Department to provide care for a related child or young adult placed in the home by the Department.
(81) “Residential care agency” means a child-caring agency that provides care and treatment services to a child or young adult 24 hours a day in a staffed facility.

(82)

“Residential family-based program” is a residential care agency that meets the following requirements:
(a) The services are provided in a family home setting;
(b) The foster parents live in the house full time;
(c) The foster parents are the primary care providers for the children or young adults served by the program;

(d)

The program serves no more than 15 children or young adults at a time; and

(e)

The program accepts children or young adults who have sexually maladaptive behaviors, a history of eloping from care or a history of unsuccessful placement in other settings.
(83) “Safety service provider” means a participant in a protective action plan, initial safety plan, or ongoing safety plan whose actions, assistance, or supervision help a family in managing a child’s safety.
(84) “Sex trafficking” means the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, obtaining, patronizing, or soliciting of a person under the age of 18 for the purpose of a commercial sex act or the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person over the age of 18 using force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of a commercial sex act.
(85) “Sibling” means one of two or more children or young adults who are related, or would be related but for a termination or other disruption of parental rights, in one of the following ways:
(a) By blood or adoption through a common parent;
(b) Through the marriage of the legal or biological parents of the children or young adults; or
(c) Through a legal or biological parent who is the registered domestic partner of the legal or biological parent of the children or young adults.
(86) “Special immigrant juvenile status” means a legal process to obtain lawful permanent resident status for a child who does not have lawful permanent resident status because he or she entered the United States without inspection and who meets the other criteria required by federal law.
(87) “Substitute care” means the out-of-home placement of a child or young adult who is in the legal or physical custody and care of the Department.
(88) “Substitute caregiver” means a relative caregiver, foster parent, or provider authorized to provide care to a child or young adult in the legal or physical custody of the Department.
(89) “Successor legal guardian” means an individual who has been named in the guardianship assistance agreement, including any amendments to the agreement, as a replacement legal guardian in the event of the death or incapacity of the guardian.
(90) “Supervised visit” means a child-family contact that includes a designated third party to protect the emotional and physical safety of a child or young adult.
(91) “Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964” prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin under programs receiving federal assistance through the United States Department of Health and Human Services.
(92) “Tribal court” means the court which holds jurisdiction over Indian child custody proceedings and is either a Court of Indian Offenses, a court established and operated under code or custom of an Indian tribe, or any other administrative body of a tribe which is vested with authority over child custody proceedings.
(93) “Urgent medical need” means the onset of psychiatric symptoms requiring professional attention within 48 hours to prevent a serious deterioration in a child or young adult’s mental or physical condition.
(94) “Visit” means planned, in-person contact between the child or young adult and one or more family members.
(95) “Young adult” means a person aged 18 through 20 years.
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Last accessed
Jun. 8, 2021