State Financing of Elementary and Secondary Education

ORS 327.180
Allowed uses of grants from Student Investment Account


(1)

In addition to those moneys distributed through the State School Fund, the Department of Education shall award grants from the Student Investment Account. Grants shall be distributed as provided under ORS 327.195 (Calculations of grant amounts).

(2)

The purposes of grants distributed under ORS 327.195 (Calculations of grant amounts) shall be to:

(a)

Meet students’ mental or behavioral health needs; and

(b)

Increase academic achievement for students, including reducing academic disparities for:

(A)

Economically disadvantaged students, as determined based on eligibility for free or reduced price lunches under the United States Department of Agriculture’s current Income Eligibility Guidelines;

(B)

Students from racial or ethnic groups that have historically experienced academic disparities, as determined under rules adopted by the State Board of Education;

(C)

Students with disabilities;

(D)

Students who are English language learners;

(E)

Students who are foster children, as defined in ORS 30.297 (Liability of certain state agencies for damages caused by foster child or youth offender);

(F)

Students who are homeless, as determined under rules adopted by the State Board of Education; and

(G)

Any other student groups that have historically experienced academic disparities, as determined by the State Board of Education by rule.

(3)

Grant moneys received under ORS 327.195 (Calculations of grant amounts) may be used by a grant recipient only for:

(a)

Increasing instructional time, which may include:

(A)

More hours or days of instructional time;

(B)

Summer programs;

(C)

Before-school or after-school programs; or

(D)

Technological investments that minimize class time used for assessments administered to students.

(b)

Addressing students’ health or safety needs, which may include:

(A)

Social-emotional learning and development;

(B)

Student mental and behavioral health;

(C)

Improvements to teaching and learning practices or organizational structures that lead to better interpersonal relationships at the school;

(D)

Student health and wellness;

(E)

Trauma-informed practices;

(F)

School health professionals and assistants; or

(G)

Facility improvements directly related to improving student health or safety.

(c)

Reducing class sizes, which may include increasing the use of instructional assistants, by using evidence-based criteria to ensure appropriate student-teacher ratios or staff caseloads.

(d)

Expanding availability of and student participation in well-rounded learning experiences, which may include:

(A)

Developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive early literacy practices and programs in prekindergarten through third grade;

(B)

Culturally responsive practices and programs in grades six through eight, including learning, counseling and student support that is connected to colleges and careers;

(C)

Broadened curricular options at all grade levels, including access to:

(i)

Art, music and physical education classes;

(ii)

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics education;
(iii) Career and technical education, including career and technical student organization programs;

(iv)

Electives that are engaging to students;

(v)

Accelerated college credit programs, including dual credit programs, International Baccalaureate programs and advanced placement programs;

(vi)

Dropout prevention programs and transition supports;
(vii) Life skills classes; or
(viii) Talented and gifted programs; or

(D)

Access to licensed educators with a library media endorsement. [2019 c.122 §9]

Source

Last accessed
Jun. 26, 2021