Interagency Services

ORS 283.327
Acquisition and use of zero-emission and alternative fuel vehicles

  • use of alternative fuels
  • safety standards
  • exceptions


(1)

(a) Unless a state agency finds that it is not feasible for a zero-emission vehicle, as defined in ORS 283.398 (Findings and goals for zero-emission vehicles), to meet the specific use for which a vehicle will be purchased or leased, by 2025 the agency shall purchase or lease zero-emission vehicles for at least 25 percent of new state light-duty vehicle purchases and leases, to the extent zero-emission vehicles are available.

(b)

If the agency finds that purchasing or leasing zero-emission vehicles is not feasible, the agency may purchase or lease light-duty vehicles that are capable of using alternative fuel and that meet the requirements established by the Comprehensive National Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486).

(c)

If the agency finds that purchasing or leasing zero-emission vehicles is not feasible and that purchasing or leasing light-duty vehicles that are capable of using alternative fuel and that meet the requirements established by the Comprehensive National Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486) is not feasible, the agency may purchase or lease vehicles that the Department of Environmental Quality has identified by rule as low-emission vehicles.

(2)

To the maximum extent feasible, state-owned motor vehicles shall be zero-emission vehicles or use alternative fuel for operation.

(3)

Each agency owning motor vehicles shall comply with all safety standards established by the United States Department of Transportation in the conversion, operation and maintenance of vehicles using alternative fuel.

(4)

To the maximum extent economically possible, state-owned structures shall use biofuel, or direct-application electricity generated from biofuel, where diesel is currently utilized for stationary or back-up generation.

(5)

As used in this section:

(a)

“Light-duty vehicle” includes passenger cars, sedans, station wagons, pickup trucks with a gross vehicle rating of 8,000 pounds or less, minivans equipped for passengers or cargo, sports utility vehicles, crossover utility vehicles and specialty vehicles similar to vehicles identified in this paragraph.

(b)

“Light-duty vehicle” does not include police vehicles, fire vehicles, trucks to which a load-carrying device or container is not attached or trucks that are equipped with a dump, flatbed, tank, boom lift, crane or similar device. [1991 c.399 §2; 1993 c.335 §5; 2005 c.22 §201; 2007 c.739 §25; 2019 c.565 §3]
Note: The amendments to 283.327 (Acquisition and use of zero-emission and alternative fuel vehicles) by section 4, chapter 565, Oregon Laws 2019, become operative January 1, 2029. See section 8, chapter 565, Oregon Laws 2019. The text that is operative on and after January 1, 2029, is set forth for the user’s convenience.
283.327 (Acquisition and use of zero-emission and alternative fuel vehicles). (1)(a) Unless a state agency finds that it is not feasible for a zero-emission vehicle, as defined in ORS 283.398 (Findings and goals for zero-emission vehicles), to meet the specific use for which a vehicle will be purchased or leased, the agency shall purchase or lease zero-emission vehicles for all new state light-duty vehicle purchases and leases.

(b)

If the agency finds that purchasing or leasing zero-emission vehicles is not feasible, the agency may purchase or lease light-duty vehicles that are capable of using alternative fuel and that meet the requirements established by the Comprehensive National Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486).

(c)

If the agency finds that purchasing or leasing zero-emission vehicles is not feasible and that purchasing or leasing light-duty vehicles that are capable of using alternative fuel and that meet the requirements established by the Comprehensive National Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486) is not feasible, the agency may purchase or lease vehicles that the Department of Environmental Quality has identified by rule as low-emission vehicles.

(2)

To the maximum extent feasible, state-owned motor vehicles shall be zero-emission vehicles or use alternative fuel for operation.

(3)

Each agency owning motor vehicles shall comply with all safety standards established by the United States Department of Transportation in the conversion, operation and maintenance of vehicles using alternative fuel.

(4)

To the maximum extent economically possible, state-owned structures shall use biofuel, or direct-application electricity generated from biofuel, where diesel is currently utilized for stationary or back-up generation.

(5)

As used in this section:

(a)

“Light-duty vehicle” includes passenger cars, sedans, station wagons, pickup trucks with a gross vehicle rating of 8,000 pounds or less, minivans equipped for passengers or cargo, sports utility vehicles, crossover utility vehicles and specialty vehicles similar to vehicles identified in this paragraph.

(b)

“Light-duty vehicle” does not include police vehicles, fire vehicles, trucks to which a load-carrying device or container is not attached or trucks that are equipped with a dump, flatbed, tank, boom lift, crane or similar device.
Note: Sections 13 and 14, chapter 30, Oregon Laws 2010, provide:
Sec. 13. Distribution of natural gas to private entities for use in motor vehicles. The Oregon Department of Administrative Services, by rule, may implement a program to make available, sell, distribute and dispense compressed natural gas to private entities for use in motor vehicles. The department, by order, may establish and adjust the prices for compressed natural gas. The department shall set the price for compressed natural gas at a level that does not:

(1)

Subsidize any of the operations of any private entity; or

(2)

Substantially exceed the total costs to the department of making the compressed natural gas available. [2010 c.30 §13]
Sec. 14. Section 13, chapter 30, Oregon Laws 2010, is repealed on January 2, 2025. [2010 c.30 §14; 2013 c.526 §2; 2017 c.67 §1]

Source

Last accessed
Jun. 26, 2021