Rules of the Road for Drivers

ORS 811.035
Failure to stop and remain stopped for pedestrian who has limited vision or is blind

  • penalty


(1)

The driver of a vehicle commits the offense of failure to stop and remain stopped for a pedestrian who has limited vision or a pedestrian who is blind if the driver violates any of the following:

(a)

A driver approaching a pedestrian who has limited vision or a pedestrian who is blind or deaf-blind, who is carrying a white cane or accompanied by a dog guide, and who is crossing or about to cross a roadway, shall stop and remain stopped until the pedestrian has crossed the roadway.

(b)

Where the movement of vehicular traffic is regulated by traffic control devices, a driver approaching a pedestrian who has limited vision or a pedestrian who is blind or deaf-blind shall stop and remain stopped until the pedestrian has vacated the roadway if the pedestrian has entered the roadway and is carrying a white cane or is accompanied by a dog guide. This paragraph applies notwithstanding any other provisions of the vehicle code relating to traffic control devices.

(2)

This section is subject to the provisions and definitions relating to the rights of pedestrians who have limited vision or pedestrians who are blind or deaf-blind under ORS 814.110 (Rights for persons who are blind, who are deaf-blind or who have limited vision).

(3)

For the purposes of this section, a pedestrian is crossing the roadway when any part or extension of the pedestrian, including but not limited to any part of the pedestrian’s body, wheelchair, cane, crutch, bicycle or leashed animal, moves onto the roadway with the intent to proceed.

(4)

The offense described in this section, failure to stop and remain stopped for a pedestrian who has limited vision or a pedestrian who is blind, is a Class B traffic violation. [1983 c.338 §549; 1985 c.16 §280; 2003 c.278 §3; 2007 c.70 §329; 2011 c.507 §2; 2017 c.175 §3]
Chapter 811

See also annotations under ORS chapter 483 in permanent edition.

Notes of Decisions

Under Former Similar Statute

A party in violation of a motor vehicle statute is negligent as a matter of law unless he introduces evidence from which the trier of fact could find that he was acting as a reasonably prudent person under the circumstances. Barnum v. Williams, 264 Or 71, 504 P2d 122 (1972)

Law Review Citations

Under Former Similar Statute

10 WLJ 207 (1974)


Source

Last accessed
Jun. 26, 2021