Rules of the Road for Drivers

ORS 811.150
Interference with emergency vehicle or ambulance

  • exemptions
  • penalty


(1)

A person commits the offense of interference with an emergency vehicle or ambulance if the person does any of the following:

(a)

Drives a vehicle following at a distance closer than 500 feet any emergency vehicle or ambulance that is traveling in response to a fire alarm or emergency.

(b)

Drives or parks a vehicle in a manner that interferes with the emergency vehicle or ambulance responding to a fire alarm or emergency.

(c)

Drives over an unprotected hose of a fire department laid down on any highway, private road or driveway to be used at any fire, alarm of fire or emergency.

(2)

The following exemptions apply to this section:

(a)

Nothing in this section prohibits a driver of an emergency vehicle or ambulance from following within 500 feet of an emergency vehicle or ambulance traveling in response to a fire alarm or emergency or from driving into or parking a vehicle in the area or vicinity where such vehicles have stopped in response to an alarm or emergency.

(b)

Nothing in this section prevents any person from driving over an unprotected hose of a fire department if the person first obtains the permission of a fire department official or police officer at the scene of the fire, alarm of fire or emergency.

(3)

The offense described in this section, interference with an emergency vehicle or ambulance, is a Class B traffic violation. [1983 c.338 §584; 1985 c.16 §291; 1985 c.190 §1; 1995 c.383 §47]
Chapter 811

See also annotations under ORS chapter 483 in permanent edition.

Notes of Decisions

Under Former Similar Statute

A party in violation of a motor vehicle statute is negligent as a matter of law unless he introduces evidence from which the trier of fact could find that he was acting as a reasonably prudent person under the circumstances. Barnum v. Williams, 264 Or 71, 504 P2d 122 (1972)

Law Review Citations

Under Former Similar Statute

10 WLJ 207 (1974)


Source

Last accessed
Jun. 26, 2021