Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division

Rule Rule 437-001-0700
Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses


(1) Purpose. This rule requires employers to record work-related fatalities, injuries, and illnesses.
(2) Scope. This standard covers all employers covered by the Oregon Safe Employment Act, except for the exemptions below.
(3) Exemptions.
(a) If your company never had more than ten (10) employees during the last calendar year, including temporary employees, you do not need to keep Oregon OSHA injury and illness records unless the Director informs you in writing that you must keep records. The exemption for size is based on the number of employees in the entire company within the state of Oregon.
(b) If your company had more than ten (10) employees at any time during the last calendar year, you must keep Oregon OSHA injury and illness records unless your business is in a specific low hazard retail, service, finance, insurance, or real estate industry in Table 1. If so, you do not need to keep Oregon OSHA injury and illness records unless the government asks you to keep the records under 437-001-0700 (Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses)(22).
(c) If one or more of your company’s establishments are classified in a nonexempt industry, you must keep Oregon OSHA injury and illness records for all of such establishments unless your company is exempted because of size under 437-001-0700 (Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses)(3)(a). If a company has several business establishments engaged in different classes of business activities, some of the company’s establishments may be required to keep records, while others may be exempt.
(4) Alternate or Duplicate Records. If you create records to comply with another government agency’s injury and illness recordkeeping requirements, those records meet Oregon OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements if Oregon OSHA accepts the other agency’s records under a memorandum of understanding with that agency, or if the other agency’s records contain the same information as this standard requires you to record. Contact Oregon OSHA for help in determining if your records meet Oregon OSHA’s requirements. Table 1 (attached).
(5) Recording Criteria and Forms. Each employer required to keep records of fatalities, injuries, and illnesses must record each fatality, injury, and illness that:
(a) Is work-related; and
(b) Is a new case; and
(c) Meets one or more of the general recording criteria of OAR 437-001-0700 (Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses)(8) or the application to specific cases of OAR 437-001-0700 (Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses)(9) through (12). Table 2 (attached). The decision tree for recording work-related injuries and illnesses below shows the steps involved in making this determination. Figure 1 (attached).
(6) Work-Related. You must consider an injury or illness to be work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing injury or illness. You must presume work-relatedness for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the work environment, unless an exception in Table 3 specifically applies.
(a) Oregon OSHA defines the work environment as the establishment and other locations where one or more employees work or are present as a condition of their employment.
(b) If it is not obvious where the precipitating event occurred you must evaluate the employee’s work duties and environment to decide whether events or exposures in the work environment either caused or contributed to the condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing condition.
(c) A pre-existing injury or illness is significantly aggravated when an event or exposure in the work environment results in (A) through (D) below. Oregon OSHA considers an injury or illness to be a pre-existing if it resulted solely from a non-work-related event or exposure that occurred outside the work environment.
(A) Death, provided that the pre-existing injury or illness would likely not have resulted in death but for the occupational event or exposure.
(B) Loss of consciousness, provided that the pre-existing injury or illness would likely not have resulted in loss of consciousness but for the occupational event or exposure.
(C) One or more days away from work, or days of restricted work, or days of job transfer that otherwise would not have occurred but for the occupational event or exposure.
(D) Medical treatment in a case where no medical treatment was needed for the injury or illness before the workplace event or exposure, or a change in medical treatment was necessitated by the workplace event or exposure.
(d) An injury or illness occurring in the work environment that falls under one of the following exceptions found in Table 3 is not work-related, and is not recordable. Table 3 (attached).
(e) Travel. Injuries or illnesses occurring during travel are work-related if the employee was engaged in work activities in the interest of the employer and it is not one of the exceptions in Table 4 (attached).
(f) Work at home. Injuries and illnesses that occur while an employee works at home, including work in a home office, is work-related if the injury or illness relates directly to the work rather than to the general home environment or setting.
(g) Former employees. If you are notified that a former employee had a work related injury or illness when in your employment, record the date of the incident on the appropriate OSHA 300 log for the date of the injury. If the date is not known, use the last day of employment.
(7) New Cases. An injury or illness is a “new case” if:
(a) The employee has no previous recorded injury or illness of the same type that affects the same part of the body, or
(b) The employee previously had a recorded injury or illness of the same type that affected the same part of the body but recovered completely (all signs and symptoms disappeared) from the previous injury or illness and an event or exposure in the work environment caused the signs or symptoms to reappear.
(A) For occupational illnesses where the signs or symptoms may recur or continue in the absence of a workplace exposure, record the case only once when it is diagnosed. Examples include occupational cancer, asbestosis, byssinosis, and silicosis.
(B) You are not required to seek the advice of a physician or other licensed health care professional. If you do seek such advice, you must follow their recommendation about whether the case is a new case or a recurrence.
(8) General Recording Criteria. A work-related injury or illness is recordable if it results in any of the following: death, days away from work, restricted work or transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond first aid, or loss of consciousness. You must record a case if it involves a significant injury or illness diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional, even if it does not result in death, days away from work, restricted work or job transfer, medical treatment beyond first aid, or loss of consciousness.
(a) Death. You must record an injury or illness that results in death by entering a check mark on the OSHA 300 Log in the space for cases resulting in death.
(b) Days Away from Work. When an injury or illness involves one or more days away from work, you must record the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log with a check mark in the space for cases involving days away and an entry of the number of calendar days away from work in the number of days column. If the employee is out for an extended period of time, you must enter an estimate of the days that the employee will be away, and update the day count when the actual number of days is known.
(A) Begin counting days away on the day after the injury occurred or the illness began.
(B) End the count of days away from work on the date the physician or other licensed health care professional recommends that the employee return to work. This applies regardless of whether the employee returns earlier or later than recommended. If there is no recommendation from the physician or licensed health care professional, enter the actual number of days the employee is off work.
(C) You must count the number of calendar days the employee was unable to work as a result of the injury or illness, regardless of whether or not the employee was scheduled to work on those day(s). Include weekend days, holidays, vacation days or other days off in the total number of days recorded if the employee would not have been able to work on those days because of a work-related injury or illness.
(D) You may stop tracking of the number of calendar days away from work once the total reaches 180 days away from work and/or days of job transfer or restriction. Entering 180 in the total days away column is adequate.
(E) If the employee leaves your company for a reason unrelated to the injury or illness, such as retirement, a plant closing, or to take another job, you may stop counting days away from work or days of restriction/job transfer. If the employee leaves your company because of the injury or illness, you must estimate the total number of days away or days of restriction/job transfer and enter the day count on the 300 Log.
(F) You must enter the number of calendar days away for the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log that you prepare for the year in which the incident occurred. If the time off extends into a new year, estimate the number of days for that year and add that amount to the days from the year of occurrence. Do not split the days between years and enter amounts on the logs for two different years. Use this number to calculate the total for the annual summary, and then update the initial log entry later when the day count is known or reaches the 180-day cap.
(c) Restricted Work or Job Transfer. When an injury or illness involves restricted work or job transfer but does not involve death or days away from work, you must record the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log by placing a check mark in the space for job transfer or restriction and an entry of the number of restricted or transferred days in the restricted workdays column. Restricted work occurs when, as the result of a work-related injury or illness:
(A) You keep the employee from performing one or more of the routine functions of their job, or from working the full day that they would otherwise work; or
(B) A physician or other licensed health care professional recommends that the employee not perform one or more of the routine functions of their job, or not work the full workday that they would otherwise work.
(C) A recommended work restriction is recordable only if it affects one or more of the employee’s routine job functions. To determine whether this is the case, you must evaluate the restriction in light of the routine functions of the injured or ill employee’s job.
(D) A partial day of work is recorded as a day of job transfer or restriction for recordkeeping purposes, except for the day on which the injury occurred or the illness began.
(E) Record job transfer and restricted work cases in the same box on the OSHA 300 Log.
(F) Count days of job transfer or restriction in the same way you count days away from work. The only difference is that, if you permanently assign the injured or ill employee to a job modified or permanently changed to eliminate the routine functions the employee was restricted from performing, you may stop the day count when the modification or change is permanent. You must count at least 1-day of restricted work or job transfer for such cases.
(d) Medical Treatment. If a work-related injury or illness results in medical treatment beyond first aid, you must record it on the OSHA 300 Log. If the employee received medical treatment but remained at work without transfer or restriction and the injury or illness did not involve death, one or more days away from work, one or more days of restricted work, or one or more days of job transfer, you enter a check mark in the box for other recordable cases.
(A) “Medical treatment” is the management and care of a patient to combat disease or disorder. For this rule, medical treatment does not include:
(i) Visits to a physician or other licensed health care professional solely for observation or counseling;
(ii) The conduct of diagnostic procedures, such as x-rays and blood tests, including the administration of prescription medications solely for diagnostic purposes (e.g., eye drops to dilate pupils); or
(iii) “First aid” as in (B) below.
(B) First aid is any of the conditions listed in Table 6. This is a complete list of all first aid treatments for this standard. These treatments are considered first aid regardless of the professional status of the person providing the treatment. Table 6 (attached).
(e) Loss of Consciousness. You must record a work-related injury or illness if the worker becomes unconscious, regardless of the length of time they remain unconscious.
(f) Other Injuries and Illnesses. Work-related cases involving cancer, chronic irreversible disease, a fractured or cracked bone, or a punctured eardrum must always be recorded under the general criteria at the time of occurrence.
(9) Needlestick and Sharps Injury Recording Criteria.
(a) When an injury is diagnosed later as an infectious bloodborne disease, you must update the classification on the 300 log to reflect the new status or classification.
(b) You must record all work-related needlestick injuries and cuts from sharp objects contaminated with another person’s blood or other potentially infectious material (as defined by 1910.1030). You must enter the case on the OSHA 300 Log as an injury. To protect the employee’s privacy, do not enter the employee’s name on the OSHA 300 Log (see the requirements for privacy cases in OAR 437-001-0700 (Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses)(14)).
(10) Medical Removal Recording Criteria. If another Oregon OSHA standard requires the medical removal of an employee, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log.
(a) You must enter each medical removal case on the OSHA 300 Log as either a case involving days away from work or a case involving restricted work activity, depending on how you decide to comply with the medical removal requirement. If the medical removal is the result of a chemical exposure, you must enter the case on the OSHA 300 Log by checking the “poisoning” column.
(b) If the case involves voluntary medical removal before reaching the medical removal levels required by an Oregon OSHA standard, do not record the case on the OSHA 300 Log.
(11) Occupational Hearing Loss Recording Criteria.
(a) Hearing loss must be recorded on the OSHA 300 Log by checking the hearing loss column when:
(A) An annual audiogram reveals a Standard Threshold Shift (STS) in either or both ears; and
(B) The hearing level in the same ear is 25 dB above audiometric zero.
(b) In determining whether an STS has occurred, you may correct for the age of the employee. Use the appropriate table in Appendix A to determine the age adjustment. If the STS is 10 dB or more after the age correction, it still meets the criteria for recordability.
(c) If you retest the employee’s hearing within 30 days of the first test, and the retest does not confirm the recordable STS, you are not required to record the hearing loss case on the OSHA 300 Log. If the retest confirms the recordable STS, you must record the hearing loss case within 7 calendar days of the retest. If subsequent audiometric testing performed under the testing requirements of the noise standard (1910.95) indicates that an STS is not persistent, you may erase, delete, or line-out the recorded entry.
(d) If a physician or other licensed health care professional determines, following the rules set out in OAR 437-001-0700 (Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses)(6), that the hearing loss is not work-related or has not been significantly aggravated by occupational noise exposure, the case is not work-related. Do not record it on the OSHA 300 Log.
(12) Tuberculosis Reporting Criteria. If any of your employees has an occupational exposure to anyone with a known case of active tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive skin test or diagnosis by a physician or other licensed health care professional, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log by checking the “respiratory condition” column.
(a) Do not record a pre-employment positive skin test because the exposure was not in your workplace.
(b) Line out or erase a recorded case if you prove that:
(A) The worker lives in a household with a person diagnosed with active TB;
(B) The Public Health Department identifies the worker as a contact of an individual with a case of active TB unrelated to the workplace; or
(C) A medical investigation shows that the employee’s infection was caused by exposure to TB away from work, or proves that the case was not related to the workplace TB exposure.
(13) Removed.
(14) Forms.
(a) You must use OSHA 300, 300A, and DCBS Form 801, or equivalent forms, for recordable injuries and illnesses. The OSHA 300 form is the Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, the 300A is the Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, and the DCBS Form 801 or equivalent is the Worker’s and Employer’s Report of Occupational Injury or Disease. The OSHA 300 and 300A Summary forms must be kept on a calendar year basis.
(A) Even if you are exempt from recordkeeping, you must have at each establishment, a copy of DCBS Form 801 or equivalent for each occupational injury or illness that may result in a compensable claim.
(B) You must enter information about your business at the top of the OSHA 300 Log, enter a one or two line description for each recordable injury or illness, and summarize this information on the OSHA 300A Summary form at the end of the year.
(C) You must complete a DCBS Form 801 or equivalent form, for each recordable injury or illness entered on the OSHA 300 Log.
(D) You must enter each recordable injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log and DCBS Form 801 or equivalent within 7 calendar days of receiving information that a recordable injury or illness has occurred.
(E) An equivalent form is one that has the same information, is as readable and understandable, and is completed using the same instructions as the OSHA form it replaces. Many employers use an insurance form instead of the DCBS Form 801, or supplement an insurance form by adding any additional information required by OSHA.
(F) You may use a computer to keep your records if it can produce equivalent forms when needed.
(G) Privacy Concern Cases. If you have a “privacy concern case,” do not enter the employee’s name on the OSHA 300 Log. Instead, enter “privacy case” in the space normally used for the employee’s name. This will protect the privacy of the injured or ill employee when another employee, a former employee, or an authorized employee representative has access to the OSHA 300 Log. You must keep a separate, confidential list of the case numbers and employee names for your privacy concern cases so you can update the cases and provide the information to the government if asked to do so.
(H) The following injuries or illnesses are privacy concern cases:
(i) An injury or illness to an intimate body part or the reproductive system;
(ii) An injury or illness resulting from a sexual assault;
(iii) Mental illnesses;
(iv) HIV infection, hepatitis, or tuberculosis;
(v) Needlestick injuries and cuts from sharp objects contaminated with another person’s blood or other potentially infectious material; and
(vi) Other illnesses, if the employee voluntarily requests that his or her name not be entered on the log.
(I) If you reasonably believe that information describing the privacy concern case may be personally identifiable even though the employee’s name is omitted, use discretion in describing the injury or illness on both the OSHA 300 and DCBS 801 Forms. You must enter enough information to identify the cause of the incident and the general severity of the injury or illness, but you do not need to include details of an intimate or private nature. For example, describe a sexual assault case as “injury from assault,” or an injury to a reproductive organ could be described as “lower abdominal injury.”
(J) If you voluntarily disclose the forms to persons other than government representatives, employees, former employees or authorized representatives, you must remove or hide the employees’ names and other personally identifying information, except for the following cases:
(i) To an auditor or consultant hired by the employer to evaluate the safety and health program;
(ii) To the extent necessary for processing a claim for workers’ compensation or other insurance benefits; or
(iii) To a public health authority or law enforcement agency for uses and disclosures for which consent, an authorization, or opportunity to agree or object is not required under Department of Health and Human Services Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information, 45 CFR.164.512.
(b) In addition, health care employers as defined in ORS 654.412 (Definitions for ORS 654.412 to 654.423) must record assaults against employees on the Health Care Assault Log. See OAR 437-001-0706 (Recordkeeping for Health Care Assaults).
(15) Multiple Business Establishments. You must keep a separate OSHA 300 Log for each establishment that you expect to operate for 1-year or longer.
(a) You may keep one OSHA 300 Log that covers all of your short-term establishments. You may also include the short-term establishments’ recordable injuries and illnesses on an OSHA 300 Log that covers short-term establishments for individual company divisions or geographic regions.
(b) You may keep the records for an establishment at your headquarters or other central location if you can:
(A) Transmit information about the injuries and illnesses from the establishment to the central location within 7 calendar days of receiving information that a recordable injury or illness has occurred; and
(B) Produce and send the records from the central location to the establishment within the time frames required by OAR 437-001-0700 (Recording Workplace Injuries and Illnesses)(22) when you are required to provide records to a government representative, employees, former employees or employee representatives.
(c) You must link each employee with one of your establishments, for recordkeeping purposes. You must record the injury and illness on the OSHA 300 Log of the injured or ill employee’s establishment, or on an OSHA 300 Log that covers that employee’s short-term establishment.
(d) If the injury or illness occurs at one of your establishments, you must record the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log of the establishment where the injury or illness occurred. If the employee is injured or becomes ill and is not at one of your establishments, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log at the establishment where the employee normally works.
(16) Covered Employees. You must record on the OSHA 300 Log the recordable injuries and illnesses of all employees on your payroll, whether they are labor, executive, hourly, salary, part-time, seasonal, or migrant workers. You also must record the recordable injuries and illnesses that occur to employees who are not on your payroll if you supervise these employees on a day-to-day basis. If your business is organized as a sole proprietorship or partnership, the owner or partners are not considered employees for recordkeeping purposes.
(a) Record the injuries and illnesses to workers from temporary help agencies or employee leasing services only if you supervise these employees on a day-to-day basis.
(b) If a contractor’s employee is under the day-to-day supervision of the contractor, the contractor is responsible for recording the injury or illness. If you supervise the contractor employee’s work on a day-to-day basis, you must record the injury or illness.
(c) You and the temporary help service, employee leasing service, personnel supply service, or contractor should coordinate your efforts to make sure that each injury and illness is recorded only once: either on your OSHA 300 Log (if you provide day-to-day supervision) or on the other employer’s OSHA 300 Log (if that company provides day-to-day supervision).
(17) Annual Summary and Posting Requirements. At the end of each calendar year, you must:
(a) Review the OSHA 300 Log to verify that the entries are complete and accurate, and correct any deficiencies identified.
(b) Use the OSHA 300A Summary form to create an annual summary of injuries and illnesses recorded on the OSHA 300 Log:
(A) Total the columns on the OSHA 300 Log (if you had no recordable cases, enter zeros for each column total); and
(B) Enter the calendar year covered, the company’s name, establishment name, establishment address, annual average number of employees covered by the OSHA 300 Log, and the total hours worked by all employees covered by the OSHA 300 Log.
(C) If you are using an equivalent form other than the OSHA 300A Summary form, the summary you use must also include the employee access and employer penalty statements found on the OSHA 300A Summary form.
(c) Sign or have a representative sign the 300A Summary to certify that the OSHA 300 Log is correct to the best of the signer’s knowledge. If the summary is signed by a person other than a company executive, a company executive must also review the OSHA 300 Log in order to be generally familiar with its contents. A company executive is:
(A) An owner of the company when the company is a sole proprietorship or partnership;
(B) An officer of the corporation;
(C) The highest ranking company official working at the establishment; or
(D) The immediate supervisor of the highest ranking company official working at the establishment.
(d) Post a copy of the 300A Summary form in each establishment in a conspicuous place or places where notices to employees are customarily posted. Ensure that the posted annual summary is not altered, defaced or covered by other material.
(e) Post the 300A Summary no later than February 1 of the year following the year covered by the records and keep it posted until April 30.
(f) When you maintain records for all of your establishments at your headquarters or other central location, each 300A Summary form must be specific to each separate establishment.
(18) Paperwork Retention and Updating.
(a) You must save the OSHA 300 Log, the privacy case list (if any), the 300A Summary form, and the DCBS Form 801 or equivalent forms for 5 years following the end of the calendar year that they cover.
(b) During the storage period, you must update your stored OSHA 300 Logs to include newly discovered recordable injuries or illnesses and to show any changes that have occurred in the classification of previously recorded injuries and illnesses. If the description or outcome of a case changes, you must remove or line out the original entry and enter the new information.
(19) Change of Business Ownership. If your business changes ownership, you must record and report work-related injuries and illnesses only for the time you owned the establishment. You must transfer the records to the new owner. The new owner must save all records of the establishment kept by the prior owner, but need not update or correct the records of the prior owner.
(20) Prohibition against discrimination. Oregon Revised Statute 654.062 (Notice of violation to employer by worker)(5) prohibits discrimination against an employee for reporting a work-related fatality, injury or illness. It also protects the employee who files a safety and health complaint, asks for access to this rule, records, or otherwise exercises any rights afforded by law or rule.
(21) Employee Involvement. You must involve your employees and their representatives in the recordkeeping system.
(a) You must establish a reasonable procedure for employees to report work-related injuries and illnesses promptly and accurately. A procedure is not reasonable if it would deter or discourage a reasonable employee from accurately reporting a workplace injury or illness.
(b) You must inform each employee of your procedure for reporting work related injuries and illnesses and tell each employee how they are to report an injury or illness to you.
(c) You must inform employees that they have the right to report work-related injuries and illnesses; and that employers are prohibited from discharging or in any manner discriminating against employees for reporting work-related injuries and illnesses.
(d) You must leave the names on the 300 Log. However, to protect the privacy of injured and ill employees, do not record the employee’s name on the OSHA 300 Log for certain “privacy concern cases.”
(e) You must provide limited access to your injury and illness records for your employees and their representatives.
(A) Your employees, former employees, their personal representatives, and their authorized collective bargaining representatives have the right to access the OSHA injury and illness records, in accordance with (B) through (E) below.
(B) When an employee, former employee, personal representative, or authorized employee representative asks for copies of your current or stored OSHA 300 Log(s) for an establishment the employee or former employee has worked in, you must give the requester a copy of the relevant OSHA 300 Log(s) by the end of the next business day.
(C) When an employee, former employee, or personal representative asks for a copy of the DCBS Form 801 or equivalent describing an injury or illness to that employee or former employee, you must give the requester a copy of the DCBS Form 801 or equivalent containing that information by the end of the next business day.
(D) When an authorized employee representative asks for copies of the DCBS Form 801 or equivalent for an establishment where the agent represents employees under a collective bargaining agreement, you must give copies of those forms to the authorized employee representative within 7 calendar days. You are only required to give the authorized employee representative information from the releasable part of the DCBS Form 801 indicated in the “Worker” section. You must remove all other information from the copy of the DCBS Form 801 or equivalent form that you give to the authorized employee representative.
(E) You may not charge for these copies the first time. However, if one of the designated persons asks for additional copies, you may assess a reasonable charge for retrieving and copying the records.
(22) Providing Records to Government Representatives. When an authorized government representative asks for the records you keep in compliance with this standard, you must provide copies of the records within 4 business hours. Authorized government representatives are:
(a) A representative of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services.
(b) A representative of the Secretary of Labor conducting an inspection or investigation under the Act.
(c) A representative of the Secretary of Health and Human Services (including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health - NIOSH) conducting an investigation under Section 20(b) of the Act.
(23) Requests from the Bureau of Labor Statistics or DCBS. If you receive a Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses Form from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), or a BLS designee, or a request for data from the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, you must promptly complete the form and return it following the instructions on the survey form.
(24) Electronic submission of injury and illness records to OSHA.
(a) If your establishment had 250 or more employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and you are required to maintain an OSHA 300 log, then you must electronically submit information from the OSHA Form 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses to OSHA or OSHA’s designee. You must submit the information once a year, no later than the date listed in paragraph (24)(g) of the year after the calendar year covered by the forms.
(b) If your establishment had 20 or more employees but fewer than 250 employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and your establishment is classified in an industry listed in Table 7, then you must electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses to OSHA or OSHA’s designee. You must submit the information once a year, no later than the date listed in paragraph (24)(g) of the year after the calendar year covered by the form.
(c) For each establishment that is subject to these reporting requirements, you must provide the Employer Identification Number (EIN) used by the establishment.
(d) If you are required to submit information under paragraph (24)(a) or (24)(b), then you must submit the information once a year, by the date listed in paragraph (24)(g) of the year after the calendar year covered by the form or forms. If you are submitting information because OSHA notified you to submit information as part of an individual data collection under paragraph (24)(g), then you must submit the information as often as specified in the notification.
(e) You must submit the information electronically. Federal OSHA will provide a secure website for the electronic submission of information.
(f) If your enterprise or corporate office had ownership of or control over one or more establishments required to submit information under paragraph (24)(a) or (24)(b), then the enterprise or corporate office may collect and electronically submit the information for the establishment(s).
(g) Reporting Dates. Beginning in 2020, establishments that are required to submit under paragraph (24)(a) or (24)(b) of this section will have to submit all of the required information by March 2 of the year after the calendar year covered by the form or forms (for example, by March 2, 2020, for the forms covering 2019). Table 7 (attached). Appendix A (attached). Appendix B (attached).
[ED. NOTE: To view attachments referenced in rule text, click here to view rule.]
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