Unlawful Discrimination in Employment, Public Accommodations and Real Property Transactions

ORS 659A.221
Uniform application to all public employers

  • optional procedure for disclosures
  • rules


(1)

The Bureau of Labor and Industries by rule shall ensure that the requirements of ORS 659A.200 (Definitions for ORS 659A.200 to 659A.224) to 659A.224 (Short title) are applied uniformly to all public employers. Each public employer may adopt rules, consistent with Bureau of Labor and Industries rules, that apply to that public employer and that also implement ORS 659A.200 (Definitions for ORS 659A.200 to 659A.224) to 659A.224 (Short title).

(2)

A public employer may establish by rule an optional procedure whereby an employee who wishes to disclose information described in ORS 659A.203 (Prohibited conduct by public or nonprofit employer) (1)(b) may disclose information first to the supervisor, or if the supervisor is involved, to the supervisor next higher, but the employer must protect the employee against retaliatory or disciplinary action by any supervisor for such disclosure. [Formerly 659.540]
Note: Sections 1 and 5, chapter 83, Oregon Laws 2018, provide:
Sec. 1. Pilot program for anonymous disclosures. The directors of each of the following state agencies shall consult and cooperate with each other to develop a pilot program within each respective agency to provide an optional procedure whereby an employee may anonymously disclose information under ORS 659A.203 (Prohibited conduct by public or nonprofit employer) (1)(b):

(1)

The Oregon Health Authority;

(2)

The Department of Transportation;

(3)

The Department of Human Services; and

(4)

The Department of Environmental Quality. [2018 c.83 §1]
Sec. 5. Section 1 of this 2018 Act is repealed on January 2, 2021. [2018 c.83 §5]
§§ 659A.250 to 659A.262

(formerly 659.280 to 659.290)

Law Review Citations

26 WLR 394-395 (1990)

§§ 659A.150 to 659A.186

Notes of Decisions

Termination of employment in retaliation for invoking Oregon Family Leave Act rights constitutes wrongful discharge in violation of public policy. Yeager v. Providence Health System Oregon, 195 Or App 134, 96 P3d 862 (2004), Sup Ct review denied


Source

Last accessed
Jun. 26, 2021