Oregon
Rule Rule 581-015-2130
Autism Spectrum Disorder


(1) If a child is suspected of having an autism spectrum disorder, the following evaluations must be conducted:
(a) Developmental History as defined in OAR 581-015-2000 (Definitions)(8).
(b) Information from parents and other knowledgeable individuals regarding the child’s historical and current characteristics that are associated with an autism spectrum disorder, including:
(A) Deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts as manifested by deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, and developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships; and
(B) Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech; insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior; highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus; hyper-or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment.
(c) Observations. Three observations of the child’s behavior; at least one of which involves direct interactions with the child, and at least one of which involves direct observation or video of the child’s interactions with one or more peers in an unstructured environment when possible, or with a familiar adult. The observations must occur in multiple environments, on at least two different days, and be completed by one or more licensed professionals knowledgeable about the behavioral characteristics of autism spectrum disorder.
(d) Social Communication Assessment.  Assessments conducted by a speech and language pathologist licensed by the State Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology or the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission, in reference to developmental expectations and that address the characteristics of autism spectrum disorder to develop a profile of:
(A) Functional receptive and expressive communication, encompassing both verbal (level of spoken language) and nonverbal skills;
(B) Pragmatics across natural contexts; and
(C) Social understanding and behavior, including social-emotional reciprocity
(e) Standardized Autism Identification Tool. One or more valid and reliable standardized rating scales, observation schedules, or other assessments that identify core characteristics of autism spectrum disorder.
(f) Medical Examination or Health Assessment. A medical examination or health assessment shall be completed for children age birth to five for initial eligibility determinations, and may be completed for children above age five, as determined necessary by the team. The purpose of a medical examination or health assessment is to ensure consideration of other health and/or physical factors that may impact the child’s developmental performance for a child age 3-5 or the child’s educational performance for a child age 5-21.  A medical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder is not required to determine eligibility.
(g) Vision and Hearing Screening. Review existing screening, or if none conduct a new screening.
(h) Other.
(A) Any additional assessments that may include, measures of cognitive, adaptive, academic, behavioral-emotional, executive function/self-regulation, or sensory processing necessary to determine the impact of the suspected disability: 
(i) On the child’s developmental progress for a child age 3 to 5; or
(ii) On the child’s educational performance for a child age 5 to 21.
(B) Any additional evaluations or assessments necessary to identify the child’s educational needs.
(2) To be eligible as a child with an autism spectrum disorder, the child must meet all of the following minimum criteria:
(a) The team must have documented evidence that the child demonstrates a pattern of characteristics defined as all three social communication deficits, and at least two of the four restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities contained in this section:
(A) Child demonstrates persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, as evidenced by the all of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive):
(i) Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, ranging, for example, from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back-and-forth conversation; to reduced sharing of interests, emotions, or affect; to failure to initiate or respond to social interactions;
(ii) Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, ranging, for example, from poorly integrated verbal and nonverbal communication; to abnormalities in eye contact and body language or deficits in understanding and use of gestures; to a total lack of facial expressions and nonverbal communication; and
(iii) Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships, ranging, for example, from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit various social contexts; to difficulties in sharing imaginative play or in making friends; to absence of interest in peers.
(B) Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as evidenced by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive):
(i) Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech (e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia, idiosyncratic phrases);
(ii) Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals, need to take the same route or eat the same food every day);
(iii) Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus (e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests); or
(iv) Hyper- or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment (e.g., apparent indifference to pain/temperature, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).
(b) Characteristics are generally evident before age three, but may not have become fully evident until social demands exceed limited capacities, or may be masked by learned strategies.
(c) The characteristics of autism spectrum disorder are not better described by another established or suspected eligibility for special education services. A child may not be eligible for special education services on the basis of an autism spectrum disorder if the child’s primary disability is an emotional disturbance under OAR 581-015-2145 (Emotional Disturbance Eligibility Criteria). However, a child with autism spectrum disorder as a primary disability may also have an emotional disturbance as a secondary disability.  
(3) To be eligible for special education services as a child with an autism spectrum disorder, the eligibility team must also determine that:
(a) For a child age 3 to 5, the child’s disability has an adverse impact on the child’s developmental progress; or
(b)For a child age 5 to 21, the student’s disability has an adverse impact on the student’s educational performance.
(c) The child needs special education services as a result of the disability.
(d) The team has considered the child’s special education eligibility, and determined that the eligibility is not due to a lack of appropriate instruction in reading, including the essential components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary development; reading fluency/oral reading skills; and reading comprehension strategies); and is not due to a lack of appropriate instruction in math; and is not due to limited English proficiency.
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Last accessed
Jul. 4, 2020